Category Archives: Cover Story

Cover Story Article

August 2020

An Update on Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD): Part I

This 2-part series examines the current state of peripheral artery disease. This article focuses on disease burden, risk factors, and clinical presentation. Part 2, which will appear next month, will examine current recommendations for diagnosis and treatment.

By Aisha Cobbs, PhD Continue reading

August 2020

Diagnostic Accuracy of PADnet Xpress® in the Detection of Peripheral Artery Disease

With existing knowledge, much of the cardiovascular risk burden of peripheral artery disease (PAD) is preventable. PAD is a common atherosclerotic syndrome that is estimated to affect 12.5 million Americans and 237 million people worldwide.1 One in five Americans over the age of 65 has PAD.2 Based on national treatment patterns, more than half of all patients with PAD do not know they have it.

By Sue Duval, PhD Continue reading

July 2020

Functional Ankle Instability Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors in Male Football Players

Reported incidence rates for ankle sprains range from 15% to 45%. This study looked at self-reported ankle instability in regional European football players and found that age and injury repetition as well as exposure time and position on the field were associated with instability rates, suggesting the need for specific prevention strategies.

By A. Cruz, R. Oliveira, A.G. Silva

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June 2020

Manipulation of the Myofascia: Motivations, Methods, and Mechanisms

Foam rolling and roller massage, instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization, and percussion massage are all the rage amongst consumers all along today’s fitness continuum. But what is the evidence base for the countless claims proponents offer? These authors provide a review of the peer-reviewed literature.

By Linden A. Lechner, BSc; Michael A. Rosenblat, PT, PhD(c), CEP; and Leanne M. Ramer, PhD Continue reading

May 2020

The Utility of External Fixation for Midfoot Charcot Neuroarthropathy

When conservative therapies fail, surgical reconstruction of the foot is often required to restore function, heal ulcerations, and decrease risk of amputation in patients with CN. External fixation remains a reliable method, with plenty of advantages.

By P. Tanner Shaffer, DPM, Jonathan Hook, DPM, FACFAS, and Ben Potter, DPM Continue reading

April 2020

Using The “Reformer,” “Wunda Chair,” and “foot Corrector”: The Pilates Method Enhances Alignment and Core Awareness

A trained Pilates professional in a fully equipped studio can help your patient make significant improvement in strength and flexibility by addressing postural habits and alignment problems. Joseph Hubertus Pilates began development of his method – a body–mind approach to exercise –in the early 1920s. As a child, Pilates suffered from asthma, rickets, and rheumatic fever.

By Marianne Adams, MA, MFA Continue reading

March 2020

Injury Prevention Keeps Dancers on Their Toes

Unique partnership between University Hospitals’ Sports Medicine Team and the Cleveland Ballet focuses on performer preparation to avoid long-term problems. Efficient movement in ballet is easy to recognize, as every step the dancer takes flows seamlessly into the next, representing a perfect balance of muscular engagement and release.

By Douglas J. Guth  Continue reading

February 2020

White Paper: Foot Pronation

Over the past decades, pronation has been discussed as a potential risk factor for injuries or as the mechanism behind impact damping. However, little is understood about pronation. The objectives of this paper were to (a) define and differentiate between the terms of pronation and eversion, (b & c) underline the importance and problematic aspects of pronation.

By Benno Nigg, Anja-Verena Behling, and Joseph Hamill Continue reading

January 2020

Overuse Injuries in Sports Aren’t Wholly Preventable. But They Are Reducible

Empower athletes and work in partnership with them to reduce their risk and severity of overuse injury and keep them at the level of performance they want. Getting better at any sport, at any level, takes practice, commitment—and repetition. Basketball players shoot jump shot after jump shot, soccer players drill footwork, and cross-country athletes log seemingly endless miles.

By Nicole Wetsman Continue reading

October 2019

Needed, Proposed, Designed: An Injury Assessment and Prevention Program for Collegiate Women’s Basketball

Why are female basketball players increasingly at risk of lower-extremity injury? How should an injury prevention program for them be devised and implemented? The authors undertook a team study to find the answers. Knee injuries account for 10% to 25% of sports-related injuries.

By Major Kyle East, PT, DPT, DSC; Lieutenant Commander Lauren Brown, PT, DPT, DSC; and Colonel Donald Goss, PT, PHD Continue reading

September 2019

Vaping: How Smoking E-Cigarettes Affects Physiology and Athletic Performance

Editor’s Note: As of press time, the US Centers for Disease Control has reported 1299 cases of e-cigarette- or vaping-associated lung injury (EVALI) and issued interim guidance to assist with assessment, evaluation, management, and followup. The cases have been reported in 49 states and the Distric of Columbia, with 26 deaths reported across 21 states.

By Nicole Wetsman Continue reading

August 2019

Pregnancy Changes the Body: Here’s What That Means for Gait, Balance, and Falls

About a quarter of women fall during pregnancy and 10% fall more than once. Understanding the biomechanical changes of this transitional period may help researchers find ways to prevent such falls. When Robert Catena’s wife was pregnant and working at a restaurant, she fell. It was scary, he says, but everything was ok.

By Nicole Wetsman Continue reading

July 2019

Wounded Warrior Workforce Enhancement Legislation Introduced as Georgia Tech Deactivates MSPO Program

Will Congress act to provide for the ongoing care of America’s wounded warriors? The unfortunate truth: The need for prosthetic and orthotic (P&O) care is growing in this country, thanks, in part, to events on the other side of the globe—namely, unconventional warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan, although uncontrolled cardiovascular disease and diabetes continue to each play their devastating role.

By Keith Loria and Janice T. Radak Continue reading

May 2019

PRACTICAL MATTER FOR CLINICIANS: Women Are Biomechanically Distinct From Men When They Run

Learn how men and women are constructed differently—and therefore why they each have a distinctive running gait—to be better equipped to manage, and prevent, female-specific lower-extremity sports injury. Starting at puberty, sex hormones begin to affect changes in bone and lean body mass—changes that are different in females than in males.

By Ray M. Fredericksen M.S. C-PED Continue reading

April 2019

Is There a Sprain–Brain Connection That Leads to Chronic Injury?

Research shows that ankle health plays a role in the recruitment of the muscles around it. Millions of people sprain their ankles each year, from athletes to weekend warriors to vacationers stepping off the curb wrong. The injury is common, and for most people, treatable with ice, painkillers, and rest.

By Nicole Wetsman Continue reading

March 2019

How Mountain Biking Is Reshaping the Landscape of Cycling Injury

Differences in equipment, terrain, riding style, and other risk factors mean different types and prevalence of injuries when riding a mountain bike, compared to a road bike. Be prepared to see those differences in your practice. Over the past several decades, mountain biking has become remarkably popular as a competitive and recreational activity.

By Michael Reeder, Do, And Brent Alumbaugh, MS Continue reading

February 2019

Type 2 Diabetes in Youth: A 21st Century Disorder

As obesity and overweight affect more adolescents, this disease, once attributed to middle age and older, is striking an aggressive course that all clinicians will need to address. With the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity and with 18.5% (or 13.7 million) of youth already being obese,1 type 2 diabetes (T2D) in youth is becoming an important part of every healthcare practitioner’s daily practice.

By Neil H. White, MD Continue reading

January 2019

3D Printing Is Changing the Footwear Game

The increasing cost effectiveness of 3D printing sets the stage for disrupting a decades-old process for making orthotics – No doubt: The advent of 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology has had a major impact on the field of medicine.

By Keith Loria and Janice T. Radak Continue reading

January 2019

Digital Process + Technology + Podiatric Expertise = The Future of Orthotics

New partnership puts streamlined manufacturing process in the podiatrist’s office. Three-dimensional (3D) printing has shown promise in improving medical device manufacture, but cost-effectiveness and seamless manufacturing processes have kept it from becoming mainstream. All that is about to change.

By Keith Loria Continue reading

January 2019

An Interview From NY19 Podiatric Clinical Conference

8sole Makes US Debut – “We created an orthotics toolbox for doctors,” said Pavel Repisky, a partner at 8sole, the newest 3D player in the US orthotics market. On the touchscreen monitor in front of him is the page the company believes sets them apart from other 3D providers…

By Janice T. Radak Continue reading

November 2018

Vexing Question: How Soon Should Patients Drive After Lower-Extremity Surgery?

The answer doesn’t come easily; official guidelines are lacking. Ultimately, patients bear responsibility for the decision, but you can still offer them valuable advice for keeping safe. “Doctor, when can I start driving again?”  That’s a common question patients ask when they’re headed for lower-extremity surgery. But it’s not always an easy one to answer.

By Keith Loria Continue reading

September 2018

Diabetes, Its Impact, and Protection of the Diabetic Foot

Offloading is key to preventing small concerns from becoming life-threatening, but adherence remains less than optimal. The not-so-secret truth: diabetes and its precursor, prediabetes, have reached epidemic status in the United States: More than 100 million Americans are living with the disease.

By Janice T. Radak Continue reading

August 2018

Slip, Trip, Stumble, Fall: An Overview of Falls in the Elderly and How to Prevent Them

When 88-year-old Doris fell getting out of the bathtub late on a Tuesday in the apartment she shared with her 90-year-old husband of 65 years, the ambulance took her to the hospital.  As suspected, she had broken her right hip, which was surgically corrected Wednesday morning…

By Janice T. Radak Continue reading

July 2018

Stress Fractures Of the Foot in Football

High-impact sports expose athletes to greater risk of injury overall. Is there a way to prevent such trauma by applying the lessons of sports science? Stress fractures of the foot result from repetitive microtraumas and chronic submaximal loading of tissues. Among football players, the most common are the Jones fracture, a break in the fifth metatarsal between the base and the middle, and the…

By D. Chris Cothern PT, CES, PES Continue reading

June 2018

Ankle-foot orthoses and functional electrical stimulation for foot drop in MS: Pluses, minuses, progress

Assistive ambulation devices for the ankle can bolster walking speed and safety and lessen the risk of injury to the joint. But which of 2 technologies is best for your patient?

By Hank Black Continue reading