Category Archives: Clinical News

Current Issue News

March 2019

Benefits of a Foot Orthosis During a Step-descent Task on Kinematics, Kinetics, and Activation of Muscle

Foot orthoses are considered to work by controlling internal rotation of the tibia and eversion of the calcaneus, and have been reported to be effective during weightbearing activities such as walking and running. As a result, they have been shown to be effective in managing a range of musculoskeletal conditions—not the least of which is patellofemoral pain.

By Sarah Curran, PhD, FCPodMed Continue reading

March 2019

Concurrent Changes in Eccentric Hamstring Strength and Knee-joint Kinematics

Hamstring strain incidence in soccer increases during the latter stages of match-play, consistent with experimental studies that report reduced eccentric hamstring strength during soccer-specific fatigue. The biarticular function of the hamstring is such that fatigue-induced changes in strength are also likely to have an impact on…

By Matt Greig, MPhil, PhD Continue reading

March 2019

Delayed Charcot Diagnosis Increases Costs, Hospital Days, Amputations

Early recognition and treatment of Charcot neuroarthropathy has been long considered paramount to optimizing clinical outcomes and delivering high-quality care. Without this rapid response to control the devastating effects of Charcot, patients are left with significant deformities; increased risk of ulcers, infection, and…

By Jonathan M. Labovitz, DPM, FACFAS, CHCQM Continue reading

March 2019

AFOs for Stroke: Early Use Does Not Limit Long-Term Benefit

Stroke often impairs walking, particularly by altering foot clearance during the swing phase. Activity of the tibialis anterior (TA) plays an important role in foot clearance; clinicians often prescribe an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) for post-stroke patients to help with foot clearance. Continue reading

February 2019

Anterior Femoral Ligament Thickening Seen 3 Years Post-ACL Surgery

Osteoarthritis (OA) affects nearly 50% of patients who undergo anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) within 2 decades after surgery. The mechanism of OA development has been elusive; many experts theorize that disruption of knee–joint tissue homeostasis is key. Now, researchers, using ultrasonography (US), have found an increase in the thickness of the anterior femoral cartilage and cross-sectional area 3 years postoperatively. Continue reading

February 2019

Compression in Lymphedema

In a narrative review of old and innovative concepts concerning pressure and stiffness in lymphedema therapy, the authors of a study just published in Phlebology found that the current literature does not appear to be in sync with the array of options available today. Continue reading

February 2019

Diabetes Updates:  Amputations Increasing; Insomnia as Risk Factor

Amputations on the Rise – After decades of decline, diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations appear to be on the rise in the United States, according to new data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and the National Health Interview Survey of the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Continue reading

February 2019

Bringing Medical Cannabis Into Skilled Nursing Facilities

When New York state legalized medical cannabis, geriatrician Zachary Palace, MD, CMD, realized that many of the conditions that qualified for the drug were those that he saw regularly in the elderly—like  chronic or neuropathic pain, Parkinson’s disease, and multiple sclerosis.

By Nicole Wetsman  Continue reading

February 2019

The Power of a ‘Sit to Stand’: An Infographic

Infographic by Chris Tuckett, Physiotherapist BSc MCSP. Tuckett is based in The Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, based in Harlow, Essex, UK. Based on: Harvey JA, Chastin SFM, Skelton DA. Breaking sedentary behaviour has the potential to increase/maintain function in frail older adults. J Frailty Sarcopenia Falls. 2018;3(1):26-34. doi: 10.22540/JFSF-03-026.

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February 2019

FDA Adds Boxed Warning to Uloric

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has concluded there is an increased risk of death with Uloric (febuxostat) compared to another gout medicine, allopurinol. This conclusion is based on its review of results from a safety clinical trial that found an increased risk of heart-related death and death from all causes with Uloric. Continue reading

February 2019

Book Review: Pedorthic Footwear: Assessment and Treatment

Pedorthic Footwear: Assessment and Treatment, a 578-page resource with 550 illustrations, is the result of an ambitious and unique collaboration of international authors and is edited by Klaas Postema, Karl-Heinz Schott, Dennis Janisse, and Gerardus M. Rommers. In total, 54 authors (physiatrists, pedorthists, movement scientists, and physiotherapists) from 7 countries contributed. Continue reading

January 2019

Foot Problems Affect 2/3 of Homeless Population

With homelessness on the rise, a recent systematic review sought to characterize the foot problems of homeless persons, based on the available literature. The review included 17 articles with study populations from the United States, the United Kingdom, France, and Italy. Continue reading

January 2019

Barcelona Researchers Describe New Anatomic Structure In Ankle

Human anatomy guidelines group the ankle ligaments by two ligament complexes: the lateral collateral ligament and the medial or deltoid collateral ligament. Now, a University of Barcelona (UB) research team has defined a new anatomic structure in the ankle, the lateral fibulotalocalcaneal ligament complex (LFTCL). Continue reading

January 2019

Gait Training Can Slow Age-Related Changes in Energy-Cost of Walking

The aging-induced increase in energy cost of walking can be slowed in older adults leading to improved mobility, according to new research published in the journal Innovation in Aging.

By Chris Klingenberg Continue reading

January 2019

Arch Height Does Not Affect Foot or General Health QOL

Foot-arch height does not affect specific foot and general health-related quality of life (QOL), according to a recent study in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Continue reading

January 2019

3D-Printed Knee Brace To Aid Rehab, Elderly

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology recently detailed the successful benchtop testing and pilot human movement studies of a 3D-printed knee brace. The brace, which has an embedded magnetic angle sensor and whose torsional stiffness can be adjusted by applying varying sizes of… Continue reading

January 2019

Polio-like Illness AFM Strikes Nearly 200 People in 2018

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed 196 cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a rare polio-like condition, that causes weakness in the arms or legs, across 39 states in 2018. That number could rise as some cases are still under investigation. Continue reading

November 2018

New NATA Recommendations Address Patellofemoral Pain

Patellofemoral pain (PFP), one of the most common knee problems in active people, is also one of the most challenging conditions to manage, due to its complex nature. To support athletic trainers and other healthcare providers who treat the problem, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) has published recommendations and a framework for identifying risk factors and managing patients who experience PFP. Continue reading

November 2018

Poor Balance Tied to Visual Acuity–Peripheral Vascular Disease Interaction

Poor vision has long been known as a risk factor for poor balance. This is particularly true in older adults as they perform complex balancing tasks, such as standing on 1 foot. A team of Canadian researchers wanted to determine whether poor vision would be more strongly related to standing balance in older adults who had peripheral vascular disease (PVD) or diabetes.

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November 2018

ADA Issues New Guidelines for Youth with T2D

Youth-onset type 2 diabetes (T2D), defined as T2D that develops before 20 years of age, is a growing medical challenge in the United States. A national study reported a 4.8% increase in newly diagnosed cases of T2D in this age group from 2002 to 2012. Continue reading

November 2018

VA Reports Downward Trend in Surgical Adverse Events

In an 8-year quality improvement follow-up study of reported surgical adverse events (AEs) at the US Veterans Health Administration (VHA), researchers found 277 AEs and 206 “close calls.” The data show a continuing of the downward trend from 1.74 to 0.47 AEs with harm for every 100,000 procedures, compared to the previous similar VHA studies (the periods 2001-2006 and 2006-2009). Continue reading

November 2018

HIPAA Violations Can Be Costly

A Connecticut allergy practice has agreed to pay $125,000 and enter a corrective action plan to settle an alleged Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule violation. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the violation occurred when one of the practice’s physicians disclosed a patient’s protected health information to a member of the media. Continue reading

May 2018

Wearable sensors assess relationship between foot problems and frailty

Assessing how foot problems— namely, pain, neuropathy, and deformity— contribute to frailty syndrome has been a challenge for researchers, as transporting frail elders to lab facilities creates its own set of issues. But a recent study from the University of Arizona used wearable sensors to assess the seniors in their “natural” environment and found significant relationships between the number of foot problems and degree of frailty. Continue reading

May 2018

Three-year follow-up: Close contact casting vs surgery

In a pre-specified, 3-year extension of a randomized clinical trial of equivalence, close-contact casting maintained equivalence in function compared to surgery in older adults with unstable ankle fracture. Furthermore, no significant differences were reported in quality of life or pain. The authors concluded that the focus of treatment for these patients should be on obtaining and maintaining reduction until union, using the most conservative means possible. Continue reading

May 2018

Lower-extremity amputation feared more than death

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are known for their life-threatening complications—in particular, blindness from retinopathy, kidney failure, and peripheral neuropathy. For patients with diabetes and foot pathology, amputation is a significant worry. A recent study in Foot & Ankle Specialist sought to understand just how much this population fears lower-extremity amputation (LEA).

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