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Flip Flops: Biomechanical critiques resonate with clinicians and designers

It’s no secret by now that traditional flimsy flip flops are associated with gait alterations that can contribute to more serious issues, but for many patients, flip flops are a hard habit to break. A new generation of “comfort” flip flops offers an alternative, but clinicians remain wary.

By Shalmali Pal

Editor Message


Out on a Limb: Seeking a safer preseason

Anyone watching the injuries accumulate during the most recent National Football League (NFL) preseason might be en­couraged by the league’s  plans to shorten the pre­season from four weeks to three. But the medical literature suggests a much better way to reduce the incidence of preseason injuries.

Jordana Bieze Foster, Editor

Departments


Frontal plane kinematics and risk of ankle sprain

Research suggests that a simple step-down task has a strong relationship with frontal plane ankle kinematics during walking and jump landing, and may be one method of screening or assessing for increased inversion—and, in turn, increased risk of future ankle sprain—in clinical settings.

By Luke Donovan, PhD, ATC; and Mark A. Feger, PhD, ATC

AFOs and balance issues in peripheral neuropathy

At a symposium in Cape Town, South Africa, an orthotist demonstrated his technique for treating balance issues in patients with peripheral neuropathy using ankle foot orthoses (AFOs), and a team of researchers theorized about evidence-based concepts that could help explain his findings.

By Cary Groner

Biomechanics of femoral neck fractures in runners

Factors related to joint loading during running contribute to the development of stress fractures in the femoral neck and other lower extremity structures. Research suggests these loading parameters can be reduced by altering running foot strike pattern, stride length, speed, and step rate.

By Mark Riebel, PT, DSc, OCS, SCS

Clinical prediction rules: Finding a middle ground

Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) are intended to improve patient care, but critics have suggested that—for a number of reasons—the opposite may be true. Lower extremity experts interviewed by are in agreement that, ultimately, even the best CPRs should be only one piece of the clinical puzzle.

By Cary Groner