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BRAINS, SPRAINS, AND CHRONIC PAIN: Concussion consequences may include osteoarthritis

As a growing number of studies report associa­tions between concussion and musculoskeletal injury risk, new research suggests concussed athletes may also have an increased risk of osteoarthritis later in life.

By Robert C. Lynall, PhD, ATC; Timothy C. Mauntel, PhD, ATC; David R. Howell, PhD, ATC; and Thomas A. Buckley, EdD, ATC

Editor Message


Out on a limb: Low tech, high value

The use of advanced technologies to provide feedback to patients during rehabilitation is all the rage in lower extremity healthcare. But, as exciting as these new modalities can be, it’s important to remember that low-tech feedback strategies can make hi-tech data even more clinically useful.

Jordana Bieze Foster, Editor

Departments


From barefoot running to diabetic neuropathy

Because footwear alters sensory perception, research examining the role of cutaneous feedback in barefoot running may provide important insight related to some of the gait changes that occur in patients with…

By Melissa Thompson, PhD, and Kristine Hoffman, DPM, FACFAS

Focus on biomechanics helps treat claudication

Lower extremity clinicians say ankle foot orthoses, rocker-soled shoes, and other orthotic interventions can benefit patients with peripheral arterial disease and intermittent claudication by making it easier for them to exercise, and research is starting to demonstrate these benefits.

By Shalmali Pal

Assessing runners’ gait using wearable sensors

Wearable sensors allow for the collection of running biomechanics data outside the laboratory in natural training environments, enabling clinicians to collect a large volume of information in a relatively short time to help identify and manage individuals who may be at risk for running-related injuries.

By Rachel Koldenhoven, MEd, ATC; and Alex DeJong, MEd, ATC

When a longtime patient dies: How clinicians cope

It’s not unusual for any practitioner to experience complicated emotions when a death or a terminal diagnosis disrupts the personal bond forged with a patient over many years, but experts say lower extremity clinicians often are not well equipped to deal with these emotions.

By Emily Delzell