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Knee OA in amputees: Biomechanical and technological considerations

The risk of knee osteoarthritis in the intact limb of longtime unilateral amputees is much higher than in non­amputees, and the range of potential contri­buting factors is even more complex. Optimizing prosthetic fit and function, in addition to more conventional OA interventions, can help address gait issues that contri­bute to knee joint degeneration.

By Emily Delzell

Editor Message


Out on a limb: In search of symmetry

Researchers and clinicians who work with unilateral lower limb amputees are increasingly exploring the effects of prosthetic devices on gait asymmetries and joint loading. What’s less well known is that prostheses designed for use above the waist can also have positive effects on gait.

By Jordana Bieze Foster, Editor

Departments


Rocker-bottom footwear: effects on balance, gait

Footwear with rocker soles are best known for helping to redistribute plantar pressures during gait in patients with diabetes, but research suggests they also have clinically relevant effects on balance and gait that can be beneficial for some populations but potentially dangerous for others.

By Greg Gargiulo

Chronic ankle instability and self-reported function

Using patient-reported outcome tools can give lower extremity clinicians insight into the disability experienced by patients with chronic ankle instability. A combination of instruments may be necessary, as different assessments may capture different aspects of the condition.

By Adam B. Rosen PhD, ATC; and Cathleen N. Brown PhD, ATC

Foot posture, orthoses, and patellofemoral pain

Prescription of foot orthoses for runners with patellofemoral pain (PFP) is often based on the premise that individuals with excessive pronation are among those most likely to have a positive response. However, preliminary analyses indicate this may not be the case.

By Thomas Gus Almonroeder, DPT; and John Willson, PT, PhD

Putting prehab to the test highlights inconsistencies

The growing popularity of prehabilitation contrasts with mixed findings in the lower extremity literature: Specifically, the approach seems to be more effective in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction than those undergoing hip or knee replacement.

By Cary Groner