Search Results for: stroke

February 2010

Keys to compliance in O&P: Practitioners share their success stories

Perfect compliance is probably too much to hope for. But patient education, diligent follow-up, empathy and a little imagination can go a long way toward improving device wear rates and clinical outcomes.

By L.W. Barnes

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February 2010

In the Moment: Neuromuscular

CP: Means sap strength data:Subgroup analysis may be key to gait link

Gait researchers’ frustrations in demonstrating benefits of strength training in children with cerebral palsy can be traced to the heterogeneity of the study population, according to a National Institutes of Health study that offers some insight as to which patients are most likely respond.

Plus:
• Treadmill outperforms outdoor walking for stroke rehabilitation
• Ankle weakness, not instability, explains reduced speed after TBI

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January 2010

Knee loads during golf: Implications after TKA

If the knee loads generated during a golf swing are enough to take down Tiger Woods, should it really be considered a low-impact sport? By Judy A. Blake, BA, Nikolai Steklov, BA, Shantanu Patil, MD, Clifford W. Colwell Jr., MD, and Darryl D. D’Lima, MD, PhD

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January 2010

Whole body vibration: Neuro-rehab applications

It’s popular with professional athletes and Hollywood celebrities. But WBV also has very real clinical potential for patients with neurological disorders. By Kurt Jackson, PT, PhD, GCS and Harold Merriman, PT, PhD, CLT

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January 2010

In the Moment: O&P

Knee braces activate brain – fMRI confirms proprioceptive effects Functional magnetic resonance imaging research from Belgium demonstrates the effect of lower extremity proprioceptive stimulation on brain activity and confirms that the effect of a knee brace or sleeve extends far beyond local joint biomechanics. Plus: • Ankle foot orthoses improve symmetry, gait in stroke patients with hemiplegia • Abduction bracing in infants with DDH delays learning to walk by three weeks

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December 2009

Drop foot mechanics outweigh etiology

Conditions associated with drop foot are as varied as post-stroke hemiplegia, brain or spinal cord injury, and neuromuscular disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Patients with drop foot are unable to use the dorsiflexor muscles to lift the foot clear of the ground during the gait’s swing phase, nor can they control plantar flexion during heel strike. The result is an awkward, unstable gait and a tendency to trip when the toes brush the ground.

by Cary Groner

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November 2009

Market Mechanics

• Ascent-descent studies show benefits of Proprio-Foot adaptive technology
• WalkAide effects persist for 11 months
• Fillauer expands with OTS acquisition
• ProLab launches orthotic web resource

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November 2009

Feedback-based rehab could lower risk of OA

Feedback-based gait retraining may help reduce rates of loading by improving joint kinematics and proprioception.

By Jody L. Riskowski, PhD

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November 2009

In the Moment: Foot Care

Wedges assist stroke rehab
Plus: • Kids, footwear and gait • Teens and running shoes

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October 2009

Controlling drop foot: Beyond standard AFOs

The basic goal is to improve toe clearance during swing and provide stability during stance, but new orthotic technologies do much more.

By Jeremy Farley, CPO/L

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September 2009

Obesity and O&P: Optimizing outcomes

Obese and overweight patients have a lot to lose: their cartilage, their muscle tone, their quality of life, their limbs. Few patient populations have more to gain from orthotic and prosthetic therapy. But no other group of patients poses a bigger clinical challenge.

By Cary Groner Continue reading