Search Results for: biomechanics

September 2017

Achilles prophecy: Early heel rise linked to later outcomes

Single-leg standing heel-rise test performance one year after Achilles tendon rupture is associated with the long-term recovery of ankle biomechanics, according to research from Gothenburg, Sweden. The findings may have implications for rehab­ilitation after Achilles injury, particularly with regard to relatively demanding activities such as jumping.

By Katie Bell Continue reading

September 2017

Running shoes and injury risk: Rethinking the importance of cushioning and pronation

In spite of advancements in research and subsequent modifications to running footwear design, rates of running-related injuries have not decreased. That may be because researchers and designers have been focusing on the wrong variables.

By Joseph Hamill, PhD, and Gillian Weir, PhD Continue reading

September 2017

Soft braces: Experts hunt for potential mechanisms

Soft braces are not designed to change lower extremity alignment or joint forces, but research suggests they may influence knee and ankle biomechanics in other ways, including by enhancing proprioception. This line of investigation could open the door to new therapeutic opportunities.

By Stephanie Kramer Continue reading

August 2017

Frontal plane kinematics and risk of ankle sprain

Research suggests that a simple step-down task has a strong relationship with frontal plane ankle kinematics during walking and jump landing, and may be one method of screening or assessing for increased inversion—and, in turn, increased risk of future ankle sprain—in clinical settings.

By Luke Donovan, PhD, ATC; and Mark A. Feger, PhD, ATC Continue reading

August 2017

AFOs and balance issues in peripheral neuropathy

At a symposium in Cape Town, South Africa, an orthotist demonstrated his technique for treating balance issues in patients with peripheral neuropathy using ankle foot orthoses (AFOs), and a team of researchers theorized about evidence-based concepts that could help explain his findings.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

August 2017

Vicon unveils Vertex compact camera

Oxford, UK-based Vicon in July released a new 1.3 megapixel compact camera, the Vertex. Continue reading

August 2017

Flip Flops: Biomechanical critiques resonate with clinicians and designers

It’s no secret by now that traditional flimsy flip flops are associated with gait alterations that can contribute to more serious issues, but for many patients, flip flops are a hard habit to break. A new generation of “comfort” flip flops offers an alternative, but clinicians remain wary.

By Shalmali Pal Continue reading

A lower body approach to lumbar pain in pitchers

By Jill R. Dorson What do gators, windmills, and lawnmowers all have in common? All three are nicknames for exercises that incorporate strengthening or stretching of muscles in both the lower back and the lower extremities. And all three are … Continue reading

July 2017

Gaps remain in literature on insoles and back pain

When it comes to the evidence-based use of foot orthoses to manage low back pain, clinicians and researchers point to a need for more comparisons of therapeutic devices and sham devices. Conducting such studies, however, is sometimes easier said than done.

By Larry Hand Continue reading

July 2017

Scoliosis bracing: Potential effects on gait and balance

Idiopathic scoliosis, most common in adolescent girls, is marked by a single or double spinal curve, hip and shoulder asymmetry, and pelvic obliquity (or limb-length discrepancy). These structural issues can be associated with biomechanical issues that include postural instability…

By Barbara Boughton Continue reading

July 2017

A lower body approach to lumbar pain in pitchers

What do gators, windmills, and lawnmowers all have in common? All three are nicknames for exercises that incorporate strengthening or stretching of muscles in both the lower back and the lower extremities. And all three are examples of tools baseball pitchers can…

By Jill R. Dorson Continue reading

July 2017

Tactical athletes: Maximizing their ability to protect and serve

Increasingly, clinicians and researchers are focusing on tactical athletes—including warfighters, firefighters, law enforcement officers, and other professionals—as a unique population with regard to lower extremity injuries.

By Hank Black Continue reading

July 2017

Recent trends favor use of bracing for knee OA

Experts say new research underscoring the clinical benefits of bracing for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), along with more comfortable device designs aimed at improving patient compliance, may help boost the historically low rates of brace utilization in this patient population.

By Barbara Boughton  Continue reading

July 2017

ACSM gives first young scientist award

Bloomington, IN-based American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) at its May 30-June 3 annual meeting in Denver, CO, awarded Allison Gruber, PhD, assistant professor in Indiana University Bloomington’s School of Public Health, its Young Scientist Award. Continue reading

July 2017

Gluteal effects on landing mechanics depend on activation, not just strength

Gluteal muscle activation—not just strength—is significantly associated with landing biomechanics, according to research from High Point University in North Carolina. Continue reading

June 2017

ACLR aftershocks: Deficits linger after return to sports

Several studies presented in early June at the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) annual meeting in Denver add to the growing body of research suggesting some biomechanical deficits linger for a year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), even in athletes who have been cleared to return to sports. Continue reading

June 2017

OSTEOARTHRITIS: Studies explore mechanisms for distal knee OA therapies

Studies presented in May at the 2017 ISPO World Congress in Cape Town, South Africa, added to knee experts’ understanding of the mechanisms underlying distal interventions to reduce pain and joint loading in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). Continue reading

June 2017

NONMECHANICAL EFFECTS: Sleeves showcase softer side of knee pain management

Less may be more when it comes to knee bracing in some patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and patellofemoral pain (PFP), according to studies of soft knee braces presented in May at the 2017 ISPO World Congress in Cape Town, South Africa. Continue reading

June 2017

Study challenging Root concepts reignites debate

The latest paper to challenge biomechanics-based foot orthotic management concepts developed decades ago has revital­ized a long-running discussion among foot specialists about how to define normal structure and function and which assessments should be used in prescribing foot orthoses.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

June 2017

Minimalist shoes: Risks and benefits for runners

Although there may be benefits to a change in running footwear, there are also risks associated with a switch to minimalist running shoes. Alterations in anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics associated with transitioning to minimalist footwear are likely to be unique to each runner.

By J. Todd Walker, MD; Donna Moxley Scarborough, PT, MS; Eric M. Berkson, MD; and Matthew J. Salzler, MD Continue reading

June 2017

Management of painful plantar fat pad atrophy

Aging and a number of medical conditions can lead to atrophy of the fat pads under the heel and forefoot, which often causes considerable pain. Cushioned footwear and orthoses are mainstays of treatment, but research also supports the use of fat grafting in recalcitrant cases.

By Barbara Boughton  Continue reading

May 2017

Somatosensory deficits following ACL surgery

Research suggests light touch sensation in the foot and ankle may be negatively affected several years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction—a finding consistent with studies that have reported decreased somatosensation in patients with other lower extremity conditions.

By Matthew Hoch, PhD, LAT; Steven Morrison, PhD; and Johanna Hoch, PhD, LAT Continue reading

May 2017

Unique orthotic strategies for low-volume footwear

The low-volume shoes worn by cyclists, figure skaters, and others can make orthotic management of these patients challenging. So, lower extremity practitioners have had to develop creative strategies for achieving the desired biomechanical effects while working within a limited space.

By Jill R. Dorson Continue reading

April 2017

Sports injury prevention experts revisit risk factors and advocate for adherence

Despite strides, gaps between lab and practice remain

It’s an exciting time for clinicians involved in preventing sports injuries. Increasing numbers of studies are identifying risk factors associated with specific injuries and documenting the effectiveness of preventive interventions for reducing injury rates. Continue reading

April 2017

By itself, zero drop in a running shoe does not translate to barefoot-like gait

A zero drop is not enough to notably alter the biomechanics of running in a cushioned shoe but may affect injury risk in some runners, according to research from Luxembourg presented at the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport, held in Monaco in March. Continue reading