Search Results for: stroke

December 2013

Richie Brace: Eponymous brace remains mainstay of evolving company

In 1996, after 15 years of sports podiatry practice, Douglas Richie, DPM, was frustrated by the ongoing challenge of fitting sport ankle braces to patients who also wore custom foot orthoses. The two products should have worked naturally together, but, because neither was made with the other in mind, the result was often ungainly and uncomfortable.

By Cary Groner

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September 2013

PAD and reamputation in patients with diabetes

In patients who undergo a minor foot amputation following a diabetic foot ulcer, severe peripheral arterial disease is the primary risk factor for subsequent major amputation, which underscores the importance of early detection and intervention for PAD in this population.

By Vincent S. Nerone, DPM, Kevin D. Springer, DPM, Darren M. Woodruff, DPM, and Said A. Atway, DPM, AACFAS

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August 2013

Motion lab targets assistive technology

Cleveland State University (CSU) opened the doors in July to its new Parker Hannifin Motion and Control Lab, where the research focus is assistive technology. Lab scientists are working on computerized “smart” prosthetic limbs that react like natural limbs and … Continue reading

July 2013

Kicking biomechanics: Importance of balance

Kicking is a whole-body movement that is responsive to a wide range of constraints related to the task, the environment, and the athlete. Preliminary research also suggests that balance control in the support leg plays a key role in athletes’ kicking performance.

By David I. Anderson, PhD, and Ben Sidaway, PT, PhD

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June 2013

COD Ankle Joint

The Center for Orthotics Design (COD) offers the COD Self-aligning Ankle Joint, which allows for conversion of a rigid ankle foot orthosis (AFO) to an articulated AFO. The ankle joint allows four-way adjustments and continually variable range of motion in … Continue reading

June 2013

Kickstart Orthosis

The Kickstart orthosis from Cadence Biomedical is a wearable device that helps stroke survivors and others with weakened muscles or disabilities regain mobility and independence. The new, diagnostic version of Kickstart allows practitioners to try the device and see its … Continue reading

June 2013

DOD awards $1M in research grants to help amputees regain walking ability

The US Department of Defense (DOD) Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program awarded Seattle-based Cadence Biomedical $1 million on May 30 to fund development of new technology for amputees. Cadence makes the Kickstart Walking System, a wearable device without batteries or … Continue reading

June 2013

Rockers and rollovers: Implications for AFOs

Practitioners and researchers are redefining rocking and rolling as key components of gait, and designing ankle foot orthoses and other orthotic and prosthetic devices to specifically address impairments in the way certain patients rock and roll.

By Cary Groner

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SPECIAL SECTION: Teachings from the East

Researchers and practitioners from across the globe came together in Hyderabad, India, in February for the World Congress of the International Society of Prosthetics & Orthotics (ISPO). LER’s exclusive coverage of the 2013 World Congress, held in India for the … Continue reading

March 2013

Cover Story Editor Message   Special Section Teachings from the East Researchers and practitioners from across the globe came together in Hyderabad, India, in February for the World Congress of the International Society of Prosthetics & Orthotics (ISPO). LER’s exclusive … Continue reading

March 2013

AP adds definition of athletic trainer

The addition of an athletic trainer definition to the upcoming edition of the Associated Press (AP) stylebook will school reporters in the field’s nomenclature, differentiating athletic trainers from personal trainers, and improve on how the profession is referenced in print … Continue reading

March 2013

Kickboxing: A creative approach to improving balance in patients with MS

Kickboxing isn’t just for elite martial artists. In fact, preliminary research suggests the kicks, punches, and knee movements associated with the sport can improve balance and mobility in patients with multiple sclerosis. And as an added bonus, it’s also fun.

By Kurt Jackson PT, PhD, GCS, and Kimberly Edginton-Bigelow, PhD

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February 2013

The influence of obesity on ankle fracture risk

Obese patients are more likely than nonobese individuals to sustain an ankle fracture, particularly a severe ankle fracture. Contributing factors may include increased torque on the ankle or low bone mineral density relative to body weight.

By Christy King, DPM, AACFAS
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January 2013

Foundation for Physical Therapy awards funds for PT scholarship and research

The Foundation for Physical Therapy, a primary source of funding for physical therapy researchers investigating innovative approaches to health delivery services, closed out 2012 by awarding $105,000 in scholarships and research grants, including two $40,000 research grants to support projects … Continue reading

January 2013

Whole body vibration for knee osteoarthritis

Whole body vibration may help improve strength and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis and may even slow disease progression. But contradictory findings, a lack of consensus on optimal parameters, and safety issues have even WBV advocates proceeding with caution.

By Cary Groner

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December 2012

Richie Brace: Eponymous brace remains mainstay of evolving company

In 1996, after 15 years of sports podiatry practice, Douglas Richie, DPM, was frustrated by the ongoing challenge of fitting sport ankle braces to patients who also wore custom foot orthoses.

By Cary Groner

Continue reading

December 2012

Allard USA: Family-owned company offers devices to meet many needs

Despite a long career that includes stints with several prominent orthotics companies, Carol Paez, director of customer satisfaction and general manager of Allard USA, said she is still growing up.

By Cary Groner

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November 2012

Drop foot fix for CMT: AFOs work both proximally and distally

The mechanism by which ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) reduce drop foot in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) involves proximal effects as well as the distal changes with which clinicians are more familiar, according to research from the UK.

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November 2012

Self-selected gait speed: A critical clinical outcome

When treating patients who are going through rehabilitation, clinicians may be overemphasizing gait distance and over­looking the importance of gait speed. Clinical assessment of gait speed is sim­ple and inexpensive but can be a signifi­cant indicator of functional recovery.

By Heather Braden, PT, MPT, PhD, GCS

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August 2012

Can AFOs help prevent falls?

Studies suggest that ankle foot orthoses can improve balance in some individuals, so it might seem logical that they would also help prevent falls. But the medical literature has yet to reveal a direct con­nection between AFOs and falls risk, and as a result the issue has become a mag­net for debate.

By Cary Groner

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August 2012

Gait alterations associated with diabetic neuropathy

Inconsistent findings from laboratory stud­­ies have made it difficult to deter­mine which gait alterations are specific to diabetic peripheral neuropathy and which also affect diabetic patients with­out neuropathy. Body-worn sensor tech­nol­ogy may help clarify the distinctions.

By Tahir Khan, DPM, and Ron Guberman, DPM, DABPS

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June 2012

ACL injury and OA risk: Surgery’s complicated role

Given the accumulating evidence linking anterior cruciate ligament injury to early-onset osteoarthritis, one might reason that surgical repair of the injured joint would decrease that risk. But too often that isn’t the case. This two-part series explores the complicated ways, both negative and positive, that surgery can influence OA risk.

By Cary Groner

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March 2012

Finding a formula for the optimal AFO

Quantitative research from The Nether­lands suggests that for every ankle foot orthosis, there is an optimal stiffness associated with the lowest energy cost of walking for a given set of gait-related impairments. Achieving this optimal device stiffness in practice, however, may require clinicians to rethink conventional ap­proaches to AFO prescription.

By Daan J.J. Bregman, PhD Continue reading

January 2012

Knee OA: The evidence for gait modification

Gait retraining can potentially alter walking biomechanics such that knee adduction moment is reduced, an inexpensive off­loading option that does not require device wear. Gait modification studies to date have primarily focused on foot rotation, trunk lean, and knee medialization.

By Michael A. Hunt, PT, PhD

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December 2011

Striking a balance: Foot orthoses in DPN

Preliminary research suggests that impaired balance in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) may improve with proprioceptive stimulation from foot orthoses. Postural instability is common in patients with diabetic neuropathy, said David Levine, DPM, CPed, who is in private practice in Frederick, MD.

By Katie Bell

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