Search Results for: biomechanics

January 2019

3D-Printed Knee Brace To Aid Rehab, Elderly

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology recently detailed the successful benchtop testing and pilot human movement studies of a 3D-printed knee brace. The brace, which has an embedded magnetic angle sensor and whose torsional stiffness can be adjusted by applying varying sizes of… Continue reading

January 2019

3D Printing Is Changing the Footwear Game

The increasing cost effectiveness of 3D printing sets the stage for disrupting a decades-old process for making orthotics – No doubt: The advent of 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology has had a major impact on the field of medicine.

By Keith Loria and Janice T. Radak Continue reading

November 2018

Vexing Question: How Soon Should Patients Drive After Lower-Extremity Surgery?

The answer doesn’t come easily; official guidelines are lacking. Ultimately, patients bear responsibility for the decision, but you can still offer them valuable advice for keeping safe. “Doctor, when can I start driving again?”  That’s a common question patients ask when they’re headed for lower-extremity surgery. But it’s not always an easy one to answer.

By Keith Loria Continue reading

November 2018

Patellofemoral Pain: An Ongoing Orthopedic Enigma

Patellofemoral pain (PFP), also known as anterior knee pain, is one of the most common but complex knee problems to manage. PFP affects approximately 23% of the general population and 29% of adolescents. Moreover, females are twice as likely to develop PFP as males.

By Lori A Bolgla, PT, PhD, MAcc, ATC, and Michelle C Boling, PhD, LAT, ATC Continue reading

September 2018

In Memoriam: Paul Scherer, DPM

Well-known lecturer, author, and educator, Paul R. Scherer, DPM, passed away October 1, 2018. Scherer contributed to the podiatric profession authoring numerous scientific articles and book chapters, as well as conducting and organizing a variety of scientific workshops at both national and state meetings. Continue reading

September 2018

UMiami Scientists to Develop Bioengineering Approach for Meniscus Tear Repairs

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from the University of Miami’s (UMiami’s) Miller School of Medicine and College of Engineering is poised to begin developing a novel, long-lasting treatment for meniscus tears. Meniscus tears, which are among the most common type of knee injuries, are currently treated via total or partial meniscectomy or suturing. In the long term, these treatments often result in meniscus degeneration, re-tear, and premature osteoarthritis of the knee. Continue reading

September 2018

Diabetes, Its Impact, and Protection of the Diabetic Foot

Offloading is key to preventing small concerns from becoming life-threatening, but adherence remains less than optimal. The not-so-secret truth: diabetes and its precursor, prediabetes, have reached epidemic status in the United States: More than 100 million Americans are living with the disease.

By Janice T. Radak Continue reading

September 2018

Barefoot Training Is Not Just for Barefoot Runners

On January 17, 2011, The New York Times published an article titled “Close Look at Orthotics Raises a Welter of Doubts.” Responding to the writing and research of Benno Nigg, it called into question much of the anecdotal information we provide to our patients when prescribing footwear and foot orthotics.

By William Smith, MSPT, C.Ped. Continue reading

September 2018

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Creates Positive Clinical Outcomes in an Outpatient Setting

A new, disposable negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) system effectively reduced the volume of varied wound types on four patients in an outpatient setting, reported Windy Cole, podiatrist at University Hospitals Ahuja Medical center, in a poster entitled, Management of Small, Lower Extremity Wounds in the Ambulatory Setting Using a Disposable, Mechanically Powered Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System. Continue reading

September 2018

Office-based Toe Amputations Are Safe and Efficient

As patients seek more affordable care options, moving surgical procedures from the hospital-based operating room to less expensive, more convenient locations is one tactic being explored. But can such procedures be done safely in these outpatient settings? New research from Podiatrists in the Department of Surgery at the Southern Arizona Veteran Affairs Health Care System provides evidence that they can…and that patients like the convenience. Continue reading

September 2018

Treating Vascular Malformations Without Surgery

Arteriovenous malformation can be managed non-surgically according to a poster presented by Rothman Institute podiatrists Faith Schick, PDM, and Nicholas Taweel, DPM. DPT. Their case report detailed how they resolved the patient’s symptoms and the case, highlighting the opportunities for non-operative treatment in this condition. Continue reading

September 2018

Foot Type Determines Effect of Orthotics on Muscle Activity

Adding a lateral bar beneath foot orthoses does not significantly alter activity in the pronator muscles in people with high-arched feet, according to preliminary data from a poster entitled, Effects of Two Types of Foot Orthoses on the Biomechanics of Participants with Cavus Feet During Walking. Continue reading

September 2018

Low Cost Insulin Spray Improves Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Spraying insulin into an open wound improves the healing of diabetic foot ulcers in diabetic patients—both type 1 and type 2, reported a poster entitled, The Outcomes of Local Flushing of Insulin on Wound Healing in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers. Continue reading

August 2018

The Future Is Knocking: Novel Sensors Could Enable Smarter Textiles

A next-generation smart textile has been developed by a team of University of Delaware (UD) engineers using light, flexible, breathable carbon nanotube composite coatings on a range of natural and synthetic fibers, such as Kevlar, wool, nylon, Spandex, and polyester. Fabric coated with this sensing technology could be… Continue reading

August 2018

Preventing Age-Related Muscle Loss

Shortly after age 50, the rate at which a person loses muscle mass begins to accelerate.1 Figure 1 is a graphical representation of the average number of quadriceps muscle fibers present in adults aged 18 to 82.2 Looking at the center of the graph, it is clear that the number of muscle fibers remains stable until around age 50.

By Tom Michaud, DC Continue reading

August 2018

Patellofemoral Pain in Adolescents Presents a Treatment Challenge

Patellofemoral pain is a common condition among adolescents, with nearly 7% of the today’s adolescent population affected.1 It’s a particular burden for girls—it affects as many as 10% of adolescent female athletes2, and the pain likely shuts them out of sports at a similar rate to…

By Nicole Wetsman Continue reading

July 2018

Stress Fractures Of the Foot in Football

High-impact sports expose athletes to greater risk of injury overall. Is there a way to prevent such trauma by applying the lessons of sports science? Stress fractures of the foot result from repetitive microtraumas and chronic submaximal loading of tissues. Among football players, the most common are the Jones fracture, a break in the fifth metatarsal between the base and the middle, and the…

By D. Chris Cothern PT, CES, PES Continue reading

July 2018

PERSPECTIVE: Chiropractic

Dr. Michaud is in chiropractic practice in Newton, Massachusetts, and is the author of Human Locomotion: The Conservative Management of Gait-Related Disorders. He discloses that he is the owner of www.humanlocomotion.org, where the Toe Strength Dynamometer discussed in this article is sold.

By Tom Michaud, DC Continue reading

July 2018

PERSPECTIVE: Podiatry

Dr. Dilnot is a Consultant Podiatrist at the Melbourne Foot Clinic, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Clinical Supervisor at LaTrobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia; and a Director at Equus Medical Products, Eltham, also in Melbourne. He discloses that he is a distributor of foot-strengthening products.

By Matthew Dilnot, DPM Continue reading

June 2018

ACFAS Calls for Manuscript, Poster Submissions

The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) has issued a call for manuscript and poster submissions to be presented at its 77th Annual Scientific Conference Program, which will be held February 14-19 in New Orleans. Continue reading

June 2018

EXPERT OPINION: Advances and alternatives in diabetic ulcer offloading

Diabetic foot ulcers pose life-threatening risks to patients with diabetes. Offloading of high pressure areas of the foot is key to successful treatment. We review various methods here.

By James McGuire, DPM, PT, LPed, FAPWHc, and Tyler Coye, BA Continue reading

June 2018

Overuse Injuries in Elite Basketball Players

Equinus is the primary mechanical cause of acquired non-traumatic foot and ankle pathology—plantar fasciitis, AT, and MSS—in running sports. The three most common lower-extremity overuse injuries among those who participate in running-related sports such as basketball have all been linked to the…

By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM, FACFAS, FASPS, FFPM RCPS (Glasg) Continue reading

June 2018

Footniche: A new paradigm for thinking about foot care

Definitions are important because words can make the difference between understanding and misunderstanding. I prefer a simple definition of footwear: that which covers the foot. This definition does not say it is a top covering of the foot—just a covering of the foot. In the definition of something as fundamental as footwear, I believe that less is more.

By Joseph M. Mozena Continue reading

May 2018

The lower limb and knee account for >75% of musculoskeletal injuries in today’s military.

Osteoarthritis is among the leading causes of disability in the United States, costing billions of dollars each year in lost work hours, treatments, and doctor visits, and leaving people sidelined from day-to-day activities. That problem is mirrored and amplified in the military, a unique segment of the population that relies heavily on physical fitness and ability.

By Nicole Wetsman Continue reading

May 2018

PERSPECTIVE: Podiatry

Dr. Segel is in private podiatry practice in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, and Director of Applied Podiatric Biomechanics at Noraxon USA. He is also a podiatric advisor and member of the medical education staff at Orthotic Holdings Inc.

By Jay Segel, DPM Continue reading