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March 2016

Strength training: Bone health benefits for men

Men with low bone mass are much less likely than their female counterparts to receive treatment. But research suggests that resistance exercise is a safe and effect­­ive way to improve bone mineral density in men and, in turn, reduce the risk of fracture and related complications

By Pamela S. Hinton, PhD Continue reading

March 2016

Ankle instability rehab emphasizes individuality

Research presented at the most recent International Ankle Symposium indicates that rehabilitation for chronic ankle instability is evolving from a one-size-fits-all approach to an increased focus on matching specific interventions to the patients who are most likely to benefit.

By Lori Roniger Continue reading

March 2016

Flexible flat foot: Effects of orthoses during gait

In this original investigation, researchers analyzed the biomechanical effects of a foot orthosis in patients with flexible flat foot during walking and the extent to which those functional effects are consistent with proposed theories about the device’s mechanism of action.

By Bruce Elliott, PT, DPT, COMT, and Juan Garbalosa, PhD, PT Continue reading

January 2016

Biomechanics of propulsion: Implications for AFOs

For many patients, the ability of an ankle foot orthosis to enhance propulsion is key to improving gait efficiency and reducing fatigue. But experts are only beginning to understand the biomechanical complexities that influence propulsion, which start with push-off but don’t end there.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

January 2016

Conference coverage: 4th PFP research retreat

Studies presented at the Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat in Manchester, UK, illustrate the progress researchers are making toward the ultimate goal of being able to tailor exercise protocols and other interventions to best address the needs of specific patient subgroups.

By Jordana Bieze Foster Continue reading

January 2016

Footwear, traction, and the risk of athletic injury

High degrees of rotational traction associated with athletic footwear can increase the risk of noncontact lower extremity injury following an unexpected neuromuscular perturbation, possibly by increasing biomechanical joint loading at the ankle and knee.

By John W. Wannop, PhD; Ryan Madden, MSc; and Darren J. Stefanyshyn, PhD, PEng Continue reading

January 2016

Yoga for knee OA pain: a mind-body approach

Although the medical literature has not yet provided definitive evidence of effectiveness, a number of existing studies suggest that yoga interventions are associated with improved physical and mental health outcomes among adults with knee osteoarthritis.

By Monica R. Maly, PT, PhD Continue reading

January 2016

Compression and clots in athletes who travel

Hemostatic activation following a marathon is lower in athletes who run with compression socks than those who run with typical athletic socks, suggesting the garments may help reduce the risk of postexercise clot formation in athletes who travel to events.

By Amanda Zaleski, MS; and Beth Taylor, PhD Continue reading

November 2015

Battles of Achilles II: How the debate is informing clinical practice

Four years later, the ongoing discussion of the relative merits of surgical and nonsurgical management of Achilles tendon rupture is starting to affect practice patterns – even in the US.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

November 2015

Surgeon finds himself on other end of scalpel

A meniscal injury gave one practitioner new insight into the patient experience and renewed his belief that healing isn’t just about what happens physically.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

November 2015

Equinus: Its surprising role in foot pathologies

Although milder than the spasticity-induced cases of equinus, limited ankle dorsiflexion in the non-neurological pop­ulation is increasingly recognized as a source of excessive strain throughout the foot and a factor in the pathogenesis of many foot conditions.

By Nicholas V. DiMassa and Jeffrey M. Whitaker DPM, FACFAS    Continue reading

November 2015

Experts revisit hyperbaric oxygen for diabetic ulcers

Recent analyses cautiously recommend the short-term adjunctive use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for diabetic foot ulcer healing under certain conditions, but in the absence of high-quality clinical trials, experts continue to debate the controversial therapy’s benefits.

By Hank Black Continue reading

November 2015

Quadriceps symmetry after ACL reconstruction

Using muscle function symmetry as an indicator of patient progress after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can provide insight about potential targets for intervention to improve movement quality, functional performance, and patient outcomes.

By Christopher Kuenze, PhD, ATC; and Adam Kelly, MS, ATC      Continue reading

November 2015

Intermittent claudication: next-generation therapy

Given that existing therapies for intermittent claudication are not appropriate for all patients, researchers are working to develop new therapies focused on improving patients’ ability to compensate for a vascular occlusion by expanding collateral artery pathways.

By Steven J. Miller, PhD; A. George Akingba, MD, PhD; and Joseph L. Unthank, PhD  Continue reading

December 2015

Telemedicine: Going virtual improves communication and outcomes

In addition to his usual daily appointments, meetings, lectures, and surgical procedures, David Armstrong, DPM, MD, PhD, a professor of surgery at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, and director of the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA) in…

By Shalmali Pal Continue reading

October 2015

The mechanistic mysteries of foam rolling

As the popularity of foam rollers escalates, researchers are scrambling to document the therapy’s effects and tease out the possible underlying mechanisms, which now appear to be more complicated than the earliest investigators had hypothesized.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

October 2015

From amputee to clinical prosthetist: four journeys

A number of amputees, many inspired by the expert care they received after losing a limb, have been motivated to pursue careers in prosthetics, where they can provide patients with a unique and personal perspective. Four of these practitioners shared their stories with.

By P.K. Daniel Continue reading

October 2015

Including injury history adds to value of FMS

Multiple studies indicate that poor movement, as assessed using the Functional Movement Screen, and past history of injury are risk factors for future injury, and a recent investigation suggests that risk is…

By MAJ Michael Garrison, PT, DSc, OCS, SCS; and MAJ Richard Westrick, PT, DSc, OCS, SCS Continue reading

October 2015

Running in an exerted state: mechanical effects

Kinematic and kinetic alterations in the lower extremities that researchers have observed during the course of a prolonged run may provide clinically relevant insights into patellofemoral pain and other conditions associated with a gradual onset of symptoms during exercise.

By Lauren Benson, MS; and Kristian O’Connor, PhD Continue reading

October 2015

Post-polio syndrome: It takes a team approach

Along with technical issues related to muscle weakness, fatigue, and pain, the challenges of managing this hetero­gen­eous population include patients’ emotional response to the idea of needing an orthotic device for a disability they thought they had overcome.

By Larry Hand Continue reading

October 2015

Hamstring injuries: The clinical promise of PRP

Preliminary research suggests platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a safe and effective means of treating hamstring injuries that do not respond to early conservative measures…

By Frank B. Wydra, MD; Ryan R. Fader, MD; Omer Mei-Dan, MD; and Eric C. McCarty, MD Continue reading

September 2015

Health literacy: the challenge of making clinical information accessible to patients

Healthcare education materials for patients are consistently written at a reading level too advanced for a significant number of people–a trend that affects all aspects of lower extremity care and can adversely affect clinical outcomes.

By Hank Black Continue reading

September 2015

Knee OA, biomechanics, and progression to TKA

The frontal and sagittal plane gait bio­mechanics associated with progression to total joint replacement in patients with knee osteoarthritis, particularly variables related to sustained loading, may be promising…

By Cheryl Hubley-Kozey, PhD, and Gillian Hatfield, PT, PhD Continue reading

September 2015

Tibial stress fractures: an evidence-based approach

Study findings suggest that increased loading rates and tibial acceleration are associated with an increased risk of sustaining a tibial stress fracture. Interventions directed at reducing these impact…

By CPT Jamie B. Morris, DPT, OCS, CSCS, and LTC Donald L. Goss, PT, PhD, OCS, ATC Continue reading

September 2015

Fifth met fractures and osteoporosis in women

Given that older women are at increased risk for osteoporosis, an increased incidence of fifth metatarsal fractures with increasing age in women suggests that such injuries could serve as an early point of entry into osteoporosis treatment and fracture prevention.

By David Beck, MD, Justin Kane, MD, and David Pedowitz, MD    Continue reading