Category Archives: Clinical News

Current Issue News

February 2011

Analyze this: Kids’ shoes

Findings suggest divergent gait effects
The findings of a recent meta-analysis seem likely to fuel the ongoing discussion about the relative biomechanical advantages of footwear relative to barefoot walking or running, but not necessarily in the ways one might expect.

Continue reading

February 2011

New frontiers in PTTD

Focus is on ultrasound, hip strength
Research presented in February at the Combined Sections Meeting of the American Physical Therapy Association highlighted underappreciated clinical characteristics of posterior tibial tendon disorder that could influence patient management.

Continue reading

February 2011

Increase in proximal joint moments does not depend on shoes’ stability

The increased joint moments associated with walking in standard athletic shoes are not affected by the amount of motion control provided by the shoe, according to research from the University of Virginia. Investigators analyzed 68 healthy young adults as they … Continue reading

February 2011

Data indicate looser lacing increases pressure time integral under forefoot

When it comes to shoe lacing, looser is not necessarily better for patients with diabetes. Loose laces are associated with higher pressure time integrals under some regions of the foot than comfortably tightened laces, according to research from the Netherlands … Continue reading

February 2011

Athletes with patellar tendinopathy demonstrate degenerative changes

Patellar tendinopathy in elite volleyball players is associated with degenerative tendon changes visible using ultrasound imaging, according to research from the University of Southern California. The findings, presented in February at the APTA’s Combined Sections Meeting, suggest that an exercise … Continue reading

February 2011

Eccentric exercise fails to add benefit for insertional Achilles tendinosis

A multimodal therapy regimen produces positive results in patients with insertional Achilles tendinosis but is not enhanced by the addition of eccentric exercise, according to research from Campbell Clinic Orthopedics in Memphis presented in February at the APTA’s Combined Sections … Continue reading

January 2011

Revisiting ACL injury

Theories posit complex mechanisms
In recent years, discussions of anterior cruciate ligament injury biomechanics have increasingly concluded that the mechanism of such injuries is likely multifactorial, with a number of different lines of research each contributing a piece of the puzzle.  Now some investigators are beginning to articulate just what these multifactorial mechanisms might entail.

Continue reading

January 2011

Achilles rupture redux

Two studies back nonsurgical approach
Nonoperatively treated Achilles tendon ruptures are no more vulnerable to re-rupture than those treated surgically as long as early mobilization is part of the protocol, according to two randomized studies that appear to contradict current evidence-based thinking.

Continue reading

January 2011

French study links leg stiffness, power to jump height, speed in tennis players

A French study suggests that leg stiffness and power in tennis players are each significantly correlated with countermovement jump height and running speed—two factors that earlier research linked to competitive performance. Investigators from the Universite du Maine in Le Mans, … Continue reading

January 2011

Five weeks of assisted training boosts jump height in elite volleyball players

Taking a load off during training may help volleyball players jump higher, according to Australian research published in the January issue of the Journal of Science & Medicine in Sport. Assisted jump training, in which 10 kg of assistance was … Continue reading

January 2011

Two tests in days after stroke predict independent walking 6 months later

Two simple tests performed within 72 hours of an ischemic stroke can help predict the likelihood of achieving independent gait after six months, according to research from the Netherlands. In 154 first-ever ischemic stroke patients who were unable to walk … Continue reading

January 2011

Slow responses should put the brakes on driving with right foot immobilized

Army researchers are recommending that patients not drive with an immobilization device on their right foot, based on a study suggesting that such devices significantly increase braking response time. Investigators from Brooke Army Medical Center in Fort Sam Houston, TX, … Continue reading

November 2010

Choosing shoes for RA

Therapeutic designs are a tough sell

Despite research supporting the use of therapeutic shoes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a study from New Zealand suggests that only 5% of patients actually wear prescribed footwear.

The lack of compliance may be related to practitioners’ failure to understand the social and emotional implications of therapeutic footwear for patients—particularly women—with RA, according to a second study from the U.K.

By Jordana Bieze Foster

Continue reading

November 2010

High-top styles, tied laces decrease Achilles tendon loading in cadavers

A high-top athletic shoe design and tightly tied laces can decrease peak Achilles tendon loading, primarily by limiting peak ankle dorsiflexion, according to a cadaver study from Virginia Tech University. Researchers analyzed the effects of low-top vs high-top athletic shoes … Continue reading

November 2010

In vivo data correlate with external effects of variable-stiffness OA shoe

The variable-stiffness shoe being developed at Stanford University not only reduces external knee adduction moment but also produces corresponding decreases in load within the joint, according to new in vivo data. The shoe (see “OA research: It’s all about the … Continue reading

November 2010

Tailoring PFP treatment

Maltracking signals VMO involvement

Research from Stanford University adds to the evidence that patellofemoral pain management may be most effective when tailored to subcategories of patients, and suggests that it’s too soon to give up on vastus medialis oblique activation as a contributing factor.

The findings were presented in early November at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

By Jordana Bieze Foster

Continue reading

November 2010

In practice, tendinopathy patients find pain relieved with platelet rich plasma

The benefits of platelet-rich plasma injection for relief of tendinopathy pain are evident outside of a controlled research setting, according to results from a Scottsdale, AZ, private practice presented in November at the AAPM&R meeting. Physiatrists at Southwest Spine & … Continue reading

November 2010

Ankle retinacula changes may predict outcomes after fascial manipulation

Fascial manipulation can improve pain and postural stability in patients with functional ankle instability and evidence of retinacular changes on magnetic resonance imaging, according to research from Italy presented in November at the AAPM&R meeting. In an earlier study, published … Continue reading

October 2010

Insoles stand test of time

Six months may be too soon to replace – Diabetic insoles may not need to be replaced as frequently as previously thought, according to research from the U.K. presented in September at the second International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics (i-FAB) conference.

Continue reading

October 2010

MRI reveals intrinsic muscle atrophy in patients with plantar fasciitis pain

Plantar intrinsic foot muscles associated with plantar fasciitis have significantly smaller cross sectional area than those in healthy feet, according to research from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, MA.

Continue reading

October 2010

History of clubfoot treatment affects kids’ activity only slightly by age of 10

Children treated for clubfoot as infants grow up to be active 10-year-olds who can keep pace with their peers during almost all activities, according to research from the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas.

Continue reading

October 2010

EMG characterizes FAI

Altered activation isn’t just at the ankle – Two studies presented at the second International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics conference add to the evidence that treatment of chronic ankle instability should focus on improving feed-forward neuromuscular control mechanisms.

Continue reading

October 2010

Rearfoot motion in runners responds to pronator-supinator strengthening

Strength training focused on the pronation and supination affects rearfoot motion in runners to a greater extent than traditional plantar- and dorsiflexion training, according to research from the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany.

Continue reading

October 2010

Study identifies gender differences in biomechanics of kicking in soccer

Gender differences in leg alignment and muscle activation during a soccer kick may in turn help explain gender differences in knee injury risk, according to research from the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

Continue reading

September 2010

Heels heighten OA risk

Flatter styles lessen stress on knee By Jordana Bieze Foster The Rhode Island Convention Center was not the place to be wearing high heels during the third week of August, when two studies presented at the annual meeting of the … Continue reading