Search Results for: trauma

January 2015

IDEO study calls for military participants with post-trauma foot, ankle weakness

The Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium (METRC) on January 2 called for participants for a Department of Defense-funded study examining the benefits of an integrated orthosis and rehabilitation program that incorporates the Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis (IDEO) and the Return to Run … Continue reading

May 2014

Rehab with energy-storing orthosis boosts function after military trauma

An integrated orthotic and rehabilitation program for soldiers with severe lower extremity trauma improves physical function and pain and decreases consideration of late amputation, even when patients begin it more than two years after injury. Continue reading

July 2013

Post-traumatic OA: Unique implications for the military

Military populations experience high rates of disability related to post-traumatic osteo­arthritis (PTOA), which does not always originate from combat injury. But military researchers are also uniquely posi­tion­ed to explore therapeutic options to minimize the effect of PTOA.

By Jessica C. Rivera, MD, Joseph C. Wenke, PhD, James R. Ficke, MD, and Anthony E. Johnson, MD

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April 2017

Sports injury prevention experts revisit risk factors and advocate for adherence

Despite strides, gaps between lab and practice remain

It’s an exciting time for clinicians involved in preventing sports injuries. Increasing numbers of studies are identifying risk factors associated with specific injuries and documenting the effectiveness of preventive interventions for reducing injury rates. Continue reading

April 2017

Protecting hip implants: Gait patterns help predict wear rates

Patient-specific implant wear rates following total hip arthroplasty (THA) are more strongly associated with gait patterns than component positioning, according to research from Chicago that suggests implant wear could be reduced with the use of predictive wear models.

By Katie Bell Continue reading

April 2017

Metatarsal morphology and injury risk in runners

Although it has not been shown to be a risk factor for stress fracture in traditional running, the presence of Morton’s foot (a second metatarsal longer than the first) alters running mechanics in ways that may exacerbate the risks of forefoot injury associated with alternative running styles.

By Brian E Stoltenberg, DPT, OCS, CSCS; and Donald L Goss, PT, PhD, OCS, ATC Continue reading

March 2017

Chronic ankle instability and self-reported function

Using patient-reported outcome tools can give lower extremity clinicians insight into the disability experienced by patients with chronic ankle instability. A combination of instruments may be necessary, as different assessments may capture different aspects of the condition.

By Adam B. Rosen PhD, ATC; and Cathleen N. Brown PhD, ATC Continue reading

March 2017

Foot posture, orthoses, and patellofemoral pain

Prescription of foot orthoses for runners with patellofemoral pain (PFP) is often based on the premise that individuals with excessive pronation are among those most likely to have a positive response. However, preliminary analyses indicate this may not be the case.

By Thomas Gus Almonroeder, DPT; and John Willson, PT, PhD Continue reading

March 2017

Putting prehab to the test highlights inconsistencies

The growing popularity of prehabilitation contrasts with mixed findings in the lower extremity literature: Specifically, the approach seems to be more effective in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction than those undergoing hip or knee replacement.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

March 2017

Knee OA in amputees: Biomechanical and technological considerations

The risk of knee osteoarthritis in the intact limb of longtime unilateral amputees is much higher than in non­amputees, and the range of potential contri­buting factors is even more complex. Optimizing prosthetic fit and function, in addition to more conventional OA interventions, can help address gait issues that contri­bute to knee joint degeneration.

By Emily Delzell Continue reading

February 2017

Managing O&P patients who are hard on devices

Even patients who obediently wear their O&P devices can pose a clinical challenge if they wear their devices past the point of breakdown. Experts offer suggestions for dealing with patients who are hard on devices—including those who are very large, very active, or very frugal.

By Shalmali Pal Continue reading

February 2017

Subconcussive subtleties: Lacrosse study links balance, impacts

Measures of cumulative subconcussive head impacts during a men’s lacrosse season are associated with decreases in balance scores from pre- to postseason, according to findings from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, CT, that could have implications for lower extremity injury risk.

By Katie Bell Continue reading

February 2017

Long after return to play, ACL injury takes toll on perceived knee function

Perceived knee function is poorer in athletes who successfully return to play after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than in their uninjured counterparts, despite no strength or balance differences between the groups, according to research from Norway.

By Jordana Bieze Foster Continue reading

January 2017

Exos Free Motion Ankle

DJO Global now offers the Exos Free Motion Ankle—a prefabricated ankle foot orthosis that can be fully customized and formed to the patient, providing functional stabilization of the ankle-foot complex and addressing bony abnormality, chronic instability, and… Continue reading

January 2017

The role of hip extensor strength during cutting

Although most clinicians tend to emphasize hip abductor and external rotator muscle  strengthening in injury prevention and rehabilitation, recent research suggests exercises to increase explosive hip extensor strength may be critical for controlling frontal plane motion during cutting tasks.

By Marc Norcross, PhD, ATC, and Sam Johnson, PhD, ATC Continue reading

January 2017

Fluoroquinolones and risk of tendon damage

As ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquino­lones are prescribed more frequently, tendon-related adverse effects are also becoming more common. Experts often do not recommend these drugs, particularly for athletes or elderly patients, and emphasize that all patients should know the risks.

By Barbara Boughton Continue reading

November 2016

Mouthguard mysteries: Can wearing one really improve athletic performance?

Multiple studies suggest that mouthguards, designed to protect athletes from dental injuries during contact sports, may also help improve muscle force and power. But plenty of other studies have found no such ben­efits, and even the experts aren’t sure what to believe.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

November 2016

Peroneal tendinopathy management in tennis

Although not as common as Achilles tendinitis, peroneal tendinitis is seen in a certain group of patients with chronic ankle instability or with a cavovarus foot.1 Peroneal tendinitis presents as lateral foot pain and may also be of unknown etiology or associated with an acute inversion injury.

By Patricia Pande, MClScPT, CSCS, CPed Continue reading

November 2016

How foot and ankle injury trends reflect today’s NFL

Professional football players are enduring higher levels of force than ever, and foot and ankle injury rates are increasing as a result. Advances in surgery and rehabili­tation have helped get players back on the field more quickly, but injury prevention remains a significant challenge.

By Will Carroll Continue reading

November 2016

Adjacent-joint arthritis after ankle arthrodesis

Altered biomechanics after ankle arthro­desis often increase stress on the adjacent joints in the foot, which can cause or exacerbate osteoarthritic degeneration in those joints. Clinicians and researchers are working to better understand this process and how to minimize patients’ risk.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

November 2016

Psychological aspects of ACL rehabilitation

The ability to identify and treat patients at risk for mental health issues after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury may help improve psychological readiness for reconstructive surgery, attitudes toward postoperative rehabilitation, and successful surgical and rehabilitation outcomes.

By John Reaume, MD, MHSA; Dana Reaume, PsyD; and Melissa A. Christino, MD Continue reading

November 2016

Sex and BFR: Too many studies exclude young women

The problematic trend of physiological studies in which young women are underrepresented now extends to research on blood flow restriction (BFR) training, according to a paper epublished in October by Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging.

By Cary Groner Continue reading

October 2016

Guna Pain Relief Products

Guna, an Italian company, has released two new products for temporary pain relief. Guna-Flam is an anti-inflammatory, low-dose homeopathic medicine intended for minor aches and pains due to acute and chronic inflammation, trauma, or… Continue reading

October 2016

AAOS announces CEO retirement, guidance for infection control and fragility fractures

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in October announced that its CEO, Karen Hackett, will retire in April 2017. During her 14-year tenure as CEO, Hackett has overseen a staff of 250 employees, an annual budget of $60 million, and the opening of… Continue reading

October 2016

Hip check: Proximal focus could help CAI rehab

Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is associated with centralized feed-forward neuro­muscular alterations that affect the hip as well as the ankle, according to research from Boston University that may have implications for rehabilitation programs in that patient population.

By Katie Bell Continue reading